A moment in time: Scotland declares for Charles II

On this day in 1649, following the execution of his father Charles I, the Scots Parliament proclaimed Charles II King of Great Britain, France and Ireland. The catch was that he had to take up the Covenant and declare Presbyterianism as the official religion in Ireland and England.

“wee, the estats of parlement of the kingdome of Scotland, doe thairfor most unanimouslie and cheerfullie, in recognisence and acknowledgement of his just right, title and successioun to the croune of these kingdomes, heereby proclaime and declare to all the world that the said lord and prince Charles is by the providence of God and by the laufull right of undoubted successioun and descent king of Great Britane, France and Ireland, whom all the subjects of this kingdome are bound humblie and faithfullie to obey, maintayne and defend according to the Nationall Covenant and the Solemne League and Covenant betuix the kingdomes with ther lyves and goods aganst all deadlie as their only righteous soveraigne lord and king.” – Records of the Parliaments of Scotland.

The announcement was made at the Mercat Cross in Edinburgh, which was sadly taken down and replaced by the current cross in 1756. This is part of the original cross.

800px-Part_of_the_original_shaft_of_the_Edinburgh_mercat_cross

Edinburgh’s mercat cross

It would be another year before he would take them up on their offer, but this set up an incredible chain of events, including war, invasion and escape.

To read about some of these events, check out these earlier posts:


Further reading:

Proclamation: of Charles II

Attribution:

“Part of the original shaft of the Edinburgh mercat cross” by Kim Traynor – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Part_of_the_original_shaft_of_the_Edinburgh_mercat_cross.JPG#/media/File:Part_of_the_original_shaft_of_the_Edinburgh_mercat_cross.JPG

 

About Cryssa Bazos

Historical fiction writer and 17th century enthusiast.
This entry was posted in 17th century and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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