Severed Knot: #NewRelease Coming Soon

At long last, my second novel, Severed Knot, is ready to hit online shelves on June 7th! You can pre-order the eBook of this romantic historical adventure through online retailers: Amazon, Kobo, Nook, Google Play, Apple Books, and for those in Australia, Angus & Robertson. The paperback will also be available online through all the same retailers. Severed Knot follows Iain Johnstone, a Scottish moss-trooper and officer in Charles Stuart’s Royalist army. Iain first appeared in Traitor’s Knot with his company of moss-troopers when he tried to steal horses from James Hart, a highwayman. Iain Johnstone always had a great deal of cheek (still…

Battle of Worcester Society

I had the pleasure and honour of speaking before the Battle of Worcester Society for their Civil War Night series. The talk happened on September 1st, two days before the 365th anniversary of the Battle of Worcester, the final engagement of the English Civil War. As well, BBC Radio Hereford Worcester interviewed me on the subject of my talk and aired the interview in the evening before the event. The subject of my talk was Captain James Hind, a Royalist Highwayman who fought for King Charles II. Captain Hind managed to escape the battlefield and elude Parliamentary soldiers who were beating the…

The Royalist Highwayman

Today marks the anniversary of the capture of Captain James Hind, infamous 17th century highwayman. Captain Hind served as the initial inspiration for my highwayman, in as far as he was a staunch royalist who became famous for targeting Roundheads. There was a great deal written about him around the time of his capture and years after his death. Most was fiction, though all of it was highly entertaining. This article was originally written for the English Historical Fiction Authors (EHFA) and appeared on the blog a year ago. I thought it a fitting tribute to repost it here on this day….

Happy Anniversary, Dear Blog

A year ago, I launched this site. Happy Anniversary Blog! We’ve had a lovely year together, exploring 17th Century history while musing about history and storytelling in general. I was a little nervous about how we would get on. Was I taking on too much of a commitment? Would I be shackled to the computer, checking stats and worrying if I could keep up the stream of postings my blog might expect? I didn’t have to worry after all. It’s a been a rewarding year. I want to thank all the visitors to my blog this past year–all 2,000 of you!…

The Start

Following the execution of his father by Parliament in 1649, Charles Stuart (later Charles II) was a king without a throne. He scanned the dance floor for likely partners to help him reclaim his crown, but France, Spain and the Netherlands were taking turns examining the potted plants. There were no takers until Scotland stepped forward and motioned to the orchestra. It was a slow and hesitating waltz, broken by alternate periods of negotiation and stubbornness on both sides. Scotland was looking for a Covenanted king, one who would uphold Presbyterianism across the three kingdoms (Scotland, England and Ireland). Reluctantly Charles agreed, and…